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July 18, 2017

Which Jobs Have the Highest Divorce Rates?

stress-and-job

This morning on Global TV’s The Morning Show, Jess discussed the connection between divorce and job stress with Jeff McArthur. Research suggests that those working in certain occupations are more likely to get divorced. Read on and watch the videos below to learn more!

Research suggests that certain occupations are associated with higher divorce rates by the age of 30:

1. Military supervisors

2. Logisticians

3. Auto mechanic

Previous research identifies divorce rates by occupation (regardless of age):

1. Dancers/choreographers (43% divorce rate)

2. Bartenders (38% divorce rate)

3. Massage Therapists (38% divorce rate)

Lowest divorce rates occur in the following professions:

1. Agricultural engineers (2% divorce rate)

2. Optometrists (4% divorce rate)

3. Transit police (5% divorce rate)

Why might this be?

  • Work stress, hours and travel requirements may play a role, but you also have to consider the causal direction of these relationships; do the jobs contribute to divorce risk or are those inclined toward certain jobs also less inclined toward a committed relationship? You also want to consider other variables including the types of partners you pursue and/or attract based on your personality, which often times influence your chosen profession.

What can you do to reduce the toll work stress can have on a relationship:

  • Job stress isn’t just correlated with relationship strain, but also with overall health costs. Women who experience high job stress are 67% more likely to have a heart attack, so it’s important to take measures to reduce stress whether you’re single or married.
  • Venting doesn’t work, as it keeps arousal and anger levels high. Instead, consider positive reframing. Talk about your stress with a friend, but with a purpose: see if you can try to tell a story or recount an incident from an alternative perspective. Positive Reframing has been shown to improve satisfaction levels at work and at home.
  • Limit work complaints to 2 minutes per day.
  • Use the “garage technique”. Pull into your garage (or driveway or elevator) and take a minute to remind yourself that the person you’re going home to didn’t cause any of the stress you experienced today.
  • Take breaks during the day to move, use a relaxation app or even a massage ball. Research shows that workplaces that encourage breaks and/or offer a relaxation/meditation room are more productive and successful.
  • Bring your pup to work or put your co-worker’s pup to release feel-good chemicals and reduce stress